Our Whare

TE WAKA AWHINA

Te Whare Wananga (House of Learning) came from the Dreams of Whaea Whinawhare Crowther. Whina had a great Aroha for children and for learning.

Opened on the 10th November 1999, with a dawn ceremony and a powhiri, The official school opening ceremony was held later at 11.00am.

The Kaupapa (story) for the Whakairo carvings) on our Whare, begins with the embodiment of the human form, as in most Maori Whare and Waka (canoe).

The Rakau (wood) used was Totara.
In this case the building is the Waka of Knowledge carrying the Tamariki, paying tribute to the past, honouring the present and going through into the future.

TEKO TEKO (HEAD)
As the materials change from wood to metal, so we move from the past to the future.

TE MAIHI (ARMS)
In this Whare, The topsides of the Waka.

Both are Steering paddles (Hoe) joined at the centre in bringing the two people together as one.

The Maori Hoe represents all of life, the male, female, celestial, terrestial, academic and spiritual and it’s gelling together to make Peace and Harmony.

The Pakeha Hoe Has the crown to recognise the partnership made with our ancestors, the whale and Celtic patterns to represent the early settlers.

TAURAPA (STERNPOST OR KEEL OF THE WAKA)

The teko teko is the shape of a Taurapa (keel), to steady and point children in the right direction in the pursuit of knowledge.

The hook, so they can go out into the world in the search for adventure.

The bottom is the Manaia (spirit); in our children the “spirit of adventure”

TE AMO (THE HULL)
The Maui- female holds the scroll; The Matau-male holds the quill, the tools of learning.

They welcome people into the Whare and farewell them when they leave.

As our tamariki do on their voyage of learning